Virtual Tour: Fort Langley Cemetery

Rich in history and home to numerous Victorian and Edwardian headstones is the Fort Langley Cemetery. As the oldest cemetery in the Township of Langley, it records many of the loves, dreams, and heartaches that shaped the development of this Fraser River community.

West family monument,
Fort Langley Cemetery.
Photograph by Ron Bryson

In 1881 when the cemetery was established, regulations required that it be located away from populated areas. Due to growth and development, the Fort Langley Cemetery is now nestled amongst the community’s historic downtown allowing residents and visitors to enjoy and learn from the stories it reveals. The Fort Langley Cemetery is located at 23105 St. Andrews Street, along Glover Road.

A brief tour of the Fort Langley Cemetery is offered below by viewing a few of the beautiful headstones that commemorate some of the early Fort Langley pioneers.

Julia Robertson’s headstone,
Fort Langley Cemetery.
Photograph by Ron Bryson

The West family monument has the distinction of being the largest and most impressive monument in the cemetery. It is crafted from white marble and rises in stages, ending in a Gothic canopy supported by four columns sheltering a classical urn. Its beauty now stands in tribute to a local pioneer family. Henry West, the family patriarch, arrived in the municipality in the early 1870's and established a prosperous steam powered sawmill east of Fort Langley.

Julia Robertson's monument is among the finest in the cemetery and is a lovely example of a Victorian grave marker filled with symbolism. The hand represents that of God, and the flowers symbolize the soul of the deceased, which is being carried up to heaven. Julia Robertson was the First Nations wife of Samuel Robertson. They operated the What Cheer House, a saloon in Derby, and the British Columbia Saloon Company in Fort Langley. When Julia passed away, she was living in Maple Ridge where her husband had acquired land. Because there was not yet a cemetery in Maple Ridge, Julia was buried in Fort Langley.

Susannah Yeoman’s grave monument,
Fort Langley Cemetery.
Photograph by Ron Bryson

Susannah Yeomans’ monument is different than most. Instead of a stone, this marker is created from cast metal and coated with zinc so as to retard rust. Similar monuments are common in communities such as Victoria, but this is the only one in Langley. With its delicate vegetal decoration and simple text, this marker acts as remembrance for another pioneer that contributed to the development of Langley.


More Information

Langley Centennial Museum
604.532.3536
museum@tol.ca